zdbd – invocation and ritual dance of the young pumpkin

Invocation and Ritual Dance of the Young Pumpkin is a fast-paced and bouncy instrumental of the sort that Zappa would continue to produce throughout his career. The song picks right up from the end of Call Any Vegetable, and the tempo builds, with the bass and oboe matching one another note-for-note.

Soon, a lightly-distorted guitar takes a tingling solo over the throbbing rhythm, giving the impression of a high-speed chase in some mythologized Old West.

Oboe provides some dramatic counterpoint to Zappa’s solo, which ripples and bounces right alongside the insistent harmony. It’s almost as though two distinct solos were being played at once – and perhaps that’s just what’s happening, with the guitar dominating one channel and the oboe the other – it’s hard for me to tell, I admit.

This is a long one, nearly 7 minutes, and the band doesn’t let up, charging through the solos as though the song were a sprint, not a marathon. About halfway through, some of the cohesion has left the tune, as though the mere act of indulging this wild journey had derailed it some. I’ve no doubt this was a conscious choice on Zappa’s part – after all, they’re “pretty good musicians,” and could easily keep the rhythm as sharp and consistent as they liked. Instead, the passion crescendoes alongside the insanity, chugging along at the dual lead of the manic guitar and lilting oboe. Zappa brings strong chords into solo alongside the triplets.

The oboe does a great job of building to the climax of the song, which yet again – now the third time – is paid off in the next tune, Soft Sell Conclusion.

zdbd – Motherly Love

A particularly radio-friendly hit, with Byrds-style harmonies, spindly guitar, and distorted electrics on the rhythm. It’s got enough twists to remind you we’re listening to Zappa, of course – the kazoo on the transitions, as well as the twisted post-chorus that drops into a minor key with a funky rhythm. They sing about the band itself, which is fair; they’re singing of their own capacity to “rock groupies …’til they sweat and cry.” Zappa’s band at the time was called the Mothers of Invention, so the implication is more than clear.

The strucutre is fairly rudimentary, but the ending section has some funny vocalising by Zappa, as well as a great, sharp tone on the guitar.

song – une langue seconde

song – une langue seconde

C#7
je dois ècrire une chant dans une

Ab7
langue seconde

C#7
je dois ècrire une chant dans une

Ab7
langue seconde

C#7
je dois ècrire une chant dans une

Ab7
langue seconde

Eb7
tu es le vert roy

Eb7
tu es le vert roy

Eb7
tu es le vert roy

F7
dans ma vie

(please forgive any mistakes. this was inspired by a challenge to write a song in a foreign language, issued by Leslie Taylor of the Manic Neon Wasteland)


Logan Bright

simulated psychopath: a song

E5        F5
simulated psycho

E5        G5b9
simulated psychopath

E5        F5
simulated psycho

E5        Bb5b9
path

E5        F5
simulated psycho

E5        G5b9
simulated psychopath

E5        F5
simulated psychopath

   G5b9            Bb5b9
is gonna catch you in the bath

C7           D-7
bubbles go a-poppin' as his

C7             D-7
cleaver goes a-choppin' and he's

C7
leavin' lots of evidence but

Edim
they're not gonna find him

E5         F5
stimulated psycho

E5         G5b9
stimulated psychopath

E5         F5
stimulated psycho

E5         Bb5b9
path

--
Logan Bright

biking on bloor: a story circle

I have two acoustic guitars and neither of them has the right number of strings. I lack a particular plastic piece that will help me to change them. I ride my ratty bike the two kilometres to the fanciest music store on Bloor Street – maybe the fanciest in the city – and traipse through the three floors of music stuff to find, finally, the string winder I seek. Alas it’s $19.99, so I won’t be stopping for lunch afterward. The ride home is bumpy and I’m keenly aware that my pocket is $20+ dollars lighter, but the winder is in there, and when I get home, I change the strings on both guitars, then play until the sun sets.


Logan Bright